Curriculum

Volume I

The first step in getting started with darkfield microscopy is to make sure that the system one is acquiring is configured to one's needs.  Once deciding on the model and camera, one needs a few basic supplies and usually some assistance in setting up the system and learning to use it.  Mistakes can be costly so it pays to have some help with the assembly and proper use of the equipment.

Next, of course, comes the sampling and there are some tips for preparing the slides and coverslips as well as how to take the best sample possible.  Then, the sample is placed on the microscope stage and explored.  Depending on one's background, what one does and does not actually observe can differ.  Being a medical doctor, hemotologist, pathologist, or microscopist does not necessarily prepare one for interpreting what is seen in darkfield.

Therefore, what is including in the initial lesson involves scanning techniques, identification of the objects seen, and tips for resolving certain frequently observed issues such as spacing of blood cells, movement, and toxicity.

From this point onwards, the emphasis will be on suboptimal conditions and how to resolve them using diet and herbs.  Each lesson will address features often observed in darkfield such as rouleaux, zeta potential, evidence of explosure to yeast or mold, metal toxicity, chemical posisoning, intraerythrocytic infections like malaria and babesia, blood parasites that are found in the plasma, bacteria, and overall quality and efficiency of red and white blood cells.

There is a lot to share and to assimilate so there will be many lessons, a forum for discussion, and a platform for uploading case histories, photomicrographs, and videos.

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GETTING STARTED

The first step in getting started with darkfield microscopy is to make sure that the system one is acquiring is configured to one's needs.  Once deciding on the model and camera, one needs a few basic supplies and usually some assistance in setting up the system and learning to use it.  Mistakes can be costly so it pays to have some help with the assembly and proper use of the equipment.

Next, of course, comes the sampling and there are some tips for preparing the slides and coverslips as well as how to take the best sample possible.  Then, the sample is placed on the microscope stage and explored.  Depending on one's background, what one does and does not actually observe can differ.  Being a medical doctor, hemotologist, pathologist, or microscopist does not necessarily prepare one for interpreting what is seen in darkfield.

DETAILS

 

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